summer 2016

Friday, July 10, 2015

covered bridges of Kings County




Millstream River #5  Centreville 1911

There are still 60 wooden covered bridges in the province of New Brunswick, 16 of which are in Kings County.  Our little drive took us to 3 of them.  It would be so interesting to visit and photograph every covered bridge in the province.  {I think someone has done this} Of course, it would take more than a day as they are scattered all over the province.

The pretty Millstream River.


This was a nice marker next to the Oldfield covered bridge seen below.  

Smith Creek Covered Bridge # 5  Oldfields, 1910.  
Note that the sign on the bridge has Oldfields and the spelling on the granite monument has no 's'.  A friend of mine who lives near this bridge just informed me that it is named for a family that had a mill near there.  I guess the Oldfields on the bridge should have an apostrophe for Oldfield's.  :-)

The 'old field' next to the Oldfields bridge.  

Oldfields Covered Bridge

Murray gave directions to a couple of French speaking tourists from Quebec which was interesting as we have very limited French and they had very limited English, but I think they figured it out.  We didn't see them stranded by the road anywhere later.  :-)  One of them said "I'm looking for a good man." and I hoped they weren't going to steal mine!!  LOL  The other one said she'd had 3 already. Oh my.  Too funny.

The 3rd covered bridge is seen in the little vale above.

This is Smith Creek #1 at Tranton 1927.

When the bridges are numbered....#1 or #5....I'm assuming there were several crossings on these rivers years ago.  Many of these bridges have been burned by vandals or by accident, destroyed by large trucks hitting support beams or lost in floods.  They are never rebuilt but replaced with steel or cement structures or never replaced.  There was a larger one on the Canaan River that was destroyed by a flood a few years ago and it still hasn't been replaced and has divided a community and cut them off from emergency services with a long detour.  Bridges are very expensive to build.   They are a beautiful part of our history and were so common in the late 19th to early 20th century.  The wood covers protected the wood floors from the elements and timber was easily gotten from the local forests.  

If you're interested in seeing photos of the covered bridges in Kings county please click on this link ~

I'll be back next week with photos of our visit to Corn Hill Nursery.  
I hope you have a wonderful weekend.  
Thank you so much for visiting and leaving your comments.  I know summer is a very busy time and many are on vacation or spending time doing other things, like gardening and enjoying the great outdoors, or spending time with family, rather than sitting in front of a computer composing blog posts and visiting other bloggers.  So enjoy this season as it is fleeting.  You're excused.  :-}

See you soon.
Pam



27 comments:

  1. Love covered bridges. It's interesting these look so similar, maybe there is a template?

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  2. I think that would be a great project for you to photograph all the covered bridges especially if you took the photos in different seasons! I wish we had covered bridges here in Ontario!

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  3. I haven't seen a covered bridge in years! You're lucky to have them in such a short distance.
    Glad those ladies didn't kidnap your man, Pamela!

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  4. You think asking for directions was a ruse? ;)

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  5. What about those in Madison County? These are just lovely, and it reminds me of the movie with Meryl Streep...I think one of her best.

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  6. beautiful area! glad those covered bridges are retained.

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  7. I love covered bridges, and just recently found one right here in my own little piece of earth- a tiny teeny one that hardly even deserved the name "covered", but I photographed the heck out of it! If I lived near more, I would definitely do a tour.
    Have a great weekend!

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  8. Lovely photos ! I love seeing all kinds of old bridges . The longer route cause they haven't rebuilt the old one there you mention in your last bit ,that is illegal here in Ontario to do that they would have to rebuild it here just for that purpose . You have a a very pretty Provence one day I will get there lol ! Thanks for sharing , Have a good weekend ! !

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  9. Your bridges are gorgeous, and unique, and have such a sense of history behind them....we have nothing like that here, we do have huge long tunnels carved out of the mountain, but since we grew up with them we kind of take them for granted. And I wonder if your bridges feel like a normal part of life to the people growing up around them.

    Gorgeous.

    Jen

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  10. Ah, I loved covered bridges, Pam, and your country scenery is just beautiful! I'd love to visit there in the summer.

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  11. They are beautiful bridges aren't they! It is a shame that they are not replaced, perhaps one day they will be! I say optimistically but probably unrealistically! Hope that you are enjoying the summer too! xx

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  12. Beautiful! Covered bridges have always appealed to me. There's one in this area crossing the Gatineau River on the Quebec side of the Ottawa River.

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  13. Laughed about the "Good man" and stealing:):) your funny. Love all these shots. It certainly is busy. Take care and hugs. B

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  14. I love covered bridges. Thanks for sharing yours. xo Laura

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  15. I think there are only a dozen or so left in my state. Covered bridges are so charming. Some of the ones local to me have been used for community suppers, stump speeches, and church meetings over the years. Isn't that fun?

    Women like those make me nervous! LOL!

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  16. Wonderful countryside - and I always envy the covered bridges. We don't seem to have too many around here, if any.

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  17. Ohhhh, I love covered bridges, but we don't have many here. These are great!

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  18. The scenery there is so beautiful and the covered bridges are wonderful! We don't have many in my state.

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  19. Oh the charm of a covered bridge . . .
    Would be such a treat to visit a few . . .
    Thank you for these three . . .

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  20. what fun. now that is a kind of list i (the hubby & i) would love to check off each & every one. fun!! they each have such differences & real character. love seeing the history & the plaque. so neat!! have a lovely weekend!! ( :

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  21. Enjoyed your covered bridges, Pamela. : )

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  22. Love your photos, Pam.. Covered bridges are lovely and I always dislike it when we lose one..
    Looking forward to your photos of Cornhill... One of the prettiest places around..
    Hope you are enjoying these lovely days.. xo

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  23. This is very interesting. I don't believe we have covered bridges like this - I've never seen one, anyway. But I have read about them and seen pictures before. Loved your shots - interesting to see the timber roof construction - like a medieval barn!

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  24. I agree with Mike above, I don't think I have ever seen a covered bridge over here. They would be really useful though with our wet weather, especially for walkers! Beautiful captures Pamela xx

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  25. Gorgeous photos, Pam. I wonder why they've covered the bridges, I've not seen any around here.
    Amalia
    xo

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  26. I'm so looking forward to our travels in your province...all the more after reading your blog! Great covered bridges.

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  27. I love covered bridges - they are such treasures! What a pretty place! I have wonderful childhood memories of covered bridges in New England. Too bad they are getting so rare these days. xo Karen

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