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Thursday, April 25, 2013

weeping willow trees







Mary, of My Little Red House, is hosting Thursday's Inspiration with this week's word prompt being "tree".

I chose weeping willow trees as my subject.  I love shade trees and maples are my favourites but willows are so pretty and graceful.
This photo above is along the walking trail by the St. John River
in Fredericton.  The old train bridge is seen through the trees.





I love a weeping willow tree don't you?

Their long branches with slender leaves droop and
sway in the breeze.

They make a lovely place to sit on a hot summer day.




This particular tree is huge and old.
It appears to have a long scar in the bark and you
can see where 2 large limbs have been removed.




This is another large old willow on the river bank.



This willow tree is nearby us and was cut down as it
had rotted and lost some big limbs.

However, willows have a tendency to regrow new shoots
and this one is flourishing once again.




Can you see the new trunk formed?  It looks like an
elephants foot.  There are lots of new shoots coming out of the old
trunk which is about 2 feet in diameter.

Pretty amazing.

Life goes on even out of a 'dead' tree stump.

I hope you will pop over and visit Mary's blog and see more photos of trees.


Have a beautiful day!

Blessings,
Pamela



22 comments:

  1. That old tree has quite a twist to its trunk, doesn't it! I do like willow trees and find them romantical and lovely; however, I've been warned time and again never to be so foolish as to plant one in my own yard. I was, however, blessed to have a willow tree in my girlhood which made the most delightful home away from home beneath its branches.

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  2. Yup...I love weeping willows. We even planted a couple on our yard a few years back. Unfortunately the ancient weeping willow on the farm yard came down in a storm a few years ago. Great photos.

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  3. i love, love, love weeping willow trees. so gorgeous. ( :

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  4. I love weeping willow trees. There were several in my childhood neighbourhood and I loved climbing them, finding a comfortable perch and surveying the world, hidden from view.
    Your photos are so lovely. Willows beside waterways are the best.

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  5. I think everyone loves weeping willows. I have many happy memories of climbing and playing in the branches when I was a child.
    Merle......

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  6. The weeping willows in Fredericton have always been beautiful!!

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  7. Oh those wonderful weeping willows are all about summer on the riverbank to me!
    A lovely post Pam.
    Shane ♥

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  8. How cool is that???
    I have BEEN there...I recognized the bridge...and I remember how beautiful the willows were...
    Thanks for sharing...

    Cheers!
    Linda :o)

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  9. Pretty amazing photo and tree. We don't have weeping willows down here, I don't think, but where I grew up we did. First glance I thought your spring had come! Totally forgot about the prompt today!

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  10. Glorious photos - our weeping willows are just beginning to leaf out.

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  11. Charming it is to see a willow tree with the sweeping branches touching the ground, the wind softly blowing through. My daughter, SIL have a huge willow tree in their front yard. The only negative I notice is the root system which stays very close to ground level plus it seems almost impossible to get the grass to grow under a willow. The beauty seems to outweigh the negatives . . . Lovely photos Pamela.

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  12. We have quite a few weeping willows in the park by the lake. At one time the area was under water and remains moist, to their liking.
    They do have a magnificent cascading shape to them and you've captured some nice ones.
    Judith

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  13. I love willow trees, and I rooted ours by just sticking a branch into the ground and now it is growing into quite the tree. : )

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  14. Looks like you moved from winter right into summer ! Great shots - sure does make one think of hot, hazy, humid summer days lazing under a tree. My favourite is still a sugar maple - partly because of their spectacular fall foliage and partly because I missed them for 15 years while living near Calgary.

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  15. Hi Pamela, We have a few willows that are on the edge of our field. It is about 15 degrees cooler sitting under our willows on a blistering hot day.I love your green pictures.....seems strange after that long winter. Have a nice Friday!

    Beautiful photos.
    Susannah

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  16. I love willows! My grandparents had one in their yard. This is very unique the way it grew back.

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  17. I love weeping willows, especially the old and established ones, I bet they could tell a few stories! We have a weeping pear at the front of our house...less damage to the foundations! Chel x

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  18. I also love weeping willows. The old ones are the nicest. I love your photo's.Have a good weekend.

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  19. Pamela---the last thing I wrote to a friend last night was---'Trees, trees and more trees'---because we have so many in the yard---and behind the house---however, we planted two Crabapples yesterday---and have two Cherry trees waiting. Thanks for sharing these--it is a variety we do not have. Very pretty!

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  20. Weeping willow is one of my favourites.
    We have a large one by the barn.
    It hasn't started to bud yet. The only problem with them is they are a dirty
    tree. Meaning small black bugs fall off in the heat.

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  21. Weeping willows are beautiful. There are a couple of huge ones along our street.

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  22. Hi Pam,

    Your weeping willow images are so pretty. For me, these trees hold a special meaning. When I was going to primary school in Toronto, there used to be this giant weeping willow in the front yard of a house in my neighbourhood. I used to walk by it four(!) times a day, as we went home for lunch in those days. For some reason, that particular weeping willow seemed to speak to me. Maybe it was its long, swaying branches, thin and droopy, that made it seem sad and lonely in comparison to its huge stature. I always acknowledged its presence by slowing down my skip whenever I passed by to make it feel that someone cared - my tendency to personify everything, started very young!

    Thanks for sharing these lovely images.

    Poppy

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